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Archive for the ‘20%’ Category

20% Project

In 20%, Digital Humanities on June 7, 2013 at 4:29 pm

There are three requirements for my 20% assignment: it must be connected to course material in some way, shape or form; it  must be awesome and it must be designed to be shared.  The project should carefully reflect that it is worth 20% of the grade. I ask students to include an annotated bibliography and a one page “story” of the process through which they conceived of, researched, and executed the project, using footnotes, if appropriate.

While I think “designing to share” helps with the development of important skills, whether a student shares their work or not is, of course, completely up to them.  This blog contains a number of examples of the work of students who have given me permission to re-post their hard work.

My colleague at the College of Charleston Anton VanderZee used it to great effect last spring in his class “Writing the ‘American’ Self: From the Founding to Facebook”, with students producing personal scrapbooks, a cookbook and even a quilt. More details and examples of Anton’s implementation of the 20% idea are available here.

I have showcased some of my student’s work. Understanding that my comments, evaluations, and so forth are between myself and the creator, I present their work “as is,” and hopefully the examples are more valuable as a result.

Here is some sample work on YouTube, Prezi, and using timeline tools.

Visual Assignment for ADKLit

In 20%, Digital Humanities on March 6, 2013 at 4:00 pm

Here are lots of links to get my students in ENGL 219 Adirondack Life and Literature at SUNY Canton started on their visual assignments.

You are free to use charred wood, crayons, pencils or watercolor if you like.  Just make sure we can take a great picture of your work to make it sharable. Here are some lists of free web drawing tools if you want to make art using your computer.

Prezi is a great way to organize and present visuals online.

Timelines are cool. Want to do a timeline? Dipity is easy to learn and handy.

Share some photos: make a slideshow or upload, tag and provide data for your pictures on flickr.

Movies are visual: make a 2-3 minute movie, put it on youtube, if it’s great, you’ll get an “A”.

There’s a lot of information on the Adirondacks on social media. Turn twitter into a story with storify.

Craft something; a piece of a quilt, pin etchings on a mushroom, moss graffiti. As long as it connects to course content and aspires to excellence, you can do whatever you want: go absolutely bananas.

Three Examples of Undergraduate Prezis

In 20%, Digital Humanities on December 14, 2011 at 4:10 pm

My students have done exciting work using the presentation tool Prezi.com.

Brian Brinig used the tool to satirize the training of Irish Rebels.

John Fisher created presentation on Ireland’s Energy Future. (If you watch the corporation-generated film, make sure you have your mouse arrow on the mute button for the incredible music).

Michael Cavanagh used prezi to make a biography of Michael Collins.

 

All student work shared with permission.

Projects Using Timeline Tools

In 20%, Digital Humanities on December 14, 2011 at 3:59 pm

When it comes to feee online timeline tools, the most effective tool I have found  is Dipity.  Here are links to two examples of student work with dipity.

Jake Barenek used it to develop this timeline on the life of Oscar Wilde for my class on Irish Prison Literature.

Future veterinarian Erik Owens did this timeline of “Mad Cow Disease in Ireland and the UK” for my class on contemporary Ireland.

Four Examples of Great Student Work on You Tube

In 20%, Digital Humanities on December 14, 2011 at 3:38 pm

As I have previously posted, engineeering student John Fisher visualized population change in the 26 counties extremely effectively for MIgration and Identity in the New Ireland.

 

 

Pre-medical student Megan Rodts took some old footage from a dance recital and some questions and developed this documentary for my class on Irish Prison Literature.

We were able to get Engineering student Kyke Collins support from CUSE and Nanovic to make a film on street musicians. He and the other students who make up Unstudios are shopping the full version at a number of film festivals.

 

 

Colin Campbell used this film of newspaper coverage of the Catholic Church in Ireland to underline an effective in-class presentation.

 

 

I present the student “as is” and (very gratefully) with student permission. I think it is appropriate that all of my comments and suggestions are between the students and myself.

Stereotypical Representations of the Irish on the Internet

In 20%, Digital Humanities on November 17, 2011 at 10:10 pm

This is a great example of a 20% project that Kathleen Toohill did on negative stereotypes of Irishness on the net last semester for my class on Migration and Identity in the New Ireland. I have no idea how she found some of this stuff, but the range and scale of offensive representations of the Irish is mindboggling.

The 20% Project

In 20%, Digital Humanities on October 24, 2011 at 3:12 pm

After mentioning my teaching assignment to a number of people at Great Lakes THATCamp this weekend, I thought I would write a little bit about the 20% Project I assigned to students.

There are three requirements for this assignment: it must be connected to course material in some way, shape or form; it  must be awesome and it must be designed to be shared.  The project should carefully reflect that it is worth 20% of the grade. I ask students to include an annotated bibliography and a one page “story” of the process through which they conceived of, researched, and executed the project, using footnotes, if appropriate.

While I think designing for sharability helps with the development of important skills, whether a student shares their work or not is, of course completely up to them.  This blog contains a number of examples of the work of students who have given me permission to re-post their hard work.